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Thinking Politically

Stories about Thinking Politically.

It Wasn’t Russia, It was the Green Party!

By: 
Myles Hoenig

We have the potential of an Edward R Murrow moment coming up if Jill Stein is called before a public hearing in the House or Senate.

I was a supporter of Jill Stein for president in 2016 as I was also a Green Party congressional candidate in Maryland. I campaigned for her, spoke at same platforms, and even planned a fundraising house party for her that was derailed by internal egos at work. I voted for her but that was the first and only time. In 2012 I voted for Stephen Durham of the Freedom Socialist Party, also being one of his 10 electors for him in this state.

I no longer support Jill. For one, as a Green she had a major flaw, a common ailment among many Greens, unfortunately many in leadership positions. She wanted the Democrats to win. She endorsed Sanders in the California primary election. Some would say that was strategically smart because it could have endeared her to his supporters, if he were to lose. But what if he won?

How Europe Underdeveloped Africa: The Legacy of Walter Rodney

By: 
Lee Wengraf

A number of African economies have experienced a massive boom in wealth and investment over the past decade. Yet most ordinary Africans live in dire poverty with diminished life expectancy, high unemployment and in societies with low-levels of industry. For the roots of these conditions of “under-development,” one historical account stands alone in importance: Walter Rodney’s How Europe Underdeveloped Africa (1972).

What’s Left of the Bolivarian Revolution?

By: 
Sujatha Fernandes

There have recently been a number of pieces featured in NACLA and the progressive media outlet Jacobin evaluating the Nicolás Maduro government in Venezuela and questioning the ongoing viability of Chavismo. Leftist commentators have proclaimed the end of the Bolivarian Revolution and the failure of twenty-first century socialism, and have offered a takedown of the alternative media outlet TeleSUR. These leftist commentators have joined the chorus of mainstream media in their negative evaluations of the Nicolás Maduro government, albeit with differing diagnoses.

Cuba: From Machistas Leninistas to Educating Homophobes

By: 
Nelson Valdes

Granted, politicians and religious institutions, of all shades and colors, have tried to legislate what were [or are] proper “carnal relations.”  Certainly for a brief time the Bolsheviks in 1922 decriminalized homosexuality. But, generally speaking, neither the communists, the socialists nor the capitalists ever elucidated a Policy on Sexual Matters that would be central to their partisan politics.

But that has changed. On December 6, 2011 US foreign policy has moved into the realm of defender of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender “rights” for some countries in the world.[1] Then, Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, announced the policy to the world noting, “I speak about this subject knowing that my own country’s record on human rights for gay people is far from perfect. Until 2003, it was still a crime in parts of our country. Many LGBT Americans have endured violence and harassment in their own lives, and for some, including many young people, bullying and exclusion are daily experiences. So we, like all nations, have more work to do to protect human rights at home.” [2]

White Liberal Guilt, Black Opportunism and the Green Party

By: 
Bruce A. Dixon

The Green Party held its annual national meeting in Newark last weekend. Amid the workshops, smaller meetings and committeefying, Greens use this meeting to elect people to their 9 member steering committee, the body that conducts the week to week management of the organization. Steering committee members are chosen by and from the 150 member national committee, which is named by state parties and national caucuses, and votes are counted according to a ranked choice scheme. I’ve been on the national committee for several years now. I wasn’t at this year’s meeting due to some health issues, but I know plenty of people who were.

A meeting of the black caucus was in progress when the results of the steering committee election were announced. A Latina delegate observed to the black caucus members present that it was a shame no black candidates for steering committee had won the election. She offered, in solidarity with the black caucus to resign her newly elected seat so that one of the black candidates could replace her, either through an applicable rule if one could be found, or in a new election.

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