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Less of What We Don't Need

Stories about Less of What We Don't Need.

A Short History ofthe Costs of Military Air Shows- Squandering the Planet’s Increasingly Scarce Fossil Fuels for our Amusement

By: 
Dr Gary G Kohls

Pilots from the US Department of the Navy returned from World War II flush with pride at winning the war in the Pacific. So, in 1946,the Navy established a base of naval air operations on the shores of the Gulf of Mexico where the Blue Angels began doing air showsfor the public, partly for recruiting future pilots and partly for raising unit morale.

Within a few years the US Air Force established a base in Texas, where the first USAF Thunderbird team began doing air shows in 1953.

Ecology: The Keystone Science

By: 
William Hawes

A missing piece from most critiques of modern capitalism revolves around the misunderstanding of ecology. To put it bluntly, there will be no squaring the circle of mass industrial civilization and an inhabitable Earth. There is no way for energy and resource use, along with all the strife, warfare, and poverty that comes along with it, to continue under the business as usual model that contemporary Western nations operate under.

There is also the problem of constructing millions of solar panels and gigantic wind farms to attempt to bring the entire world’s population to a middle class existence based on a North American, or even European levels of energy use. All of the hypothetical robots and artificial intelligence to be constructed for such a mega-endeavor needed to enact such a project would at least initially rely on fossil fuels and metals plundered from the planet, and only lead to more rapacious destruction of the world.

Erasing Flint’s Water Crisis: Or How to Lie With Statistics

By: 
Anthony DiMaggio

Mark Twain famously wrote that “there are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.” This insight is relevant to examining the apologetics of modern-day academics in the rising neoliberal assault on the public. This subservience to power is evident in efforts to rationalize governmental attacks on the most basic of human needs: access to clean water. In seeking to numb the public to basic facts and reality, the New York Times has published an op-ed analysis piece by Hernán Gómez and Kim Dietrich: “The Children of Flint Were Not Poisoned” (7/22/2018).

Protect our national forests from an increase in logging

By: 
Jim Scheff

A few weeks ago, my wife and I were backpacking on the Sheltowee Trace National Recreation Trail along Rock Creek in McCreary County when we came across a fellow hiker who’d traveled from Indiana to hike Kentucky’s long trail.

After some talk of footwear choices and blisters, she remarked on the astounding beauty of the place. “We don’t have anything like this,” she said.

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