GST Original Articles

By Don Fitz / 14 May 2018
With the escalating doom of climate change hovering over us, it is tempting to push nuclear horror to the back of our minds. To those of us who grew up in the 1950s, it was omnipresent. Nuclear war could not exist without nuclear power and on April 26, 1986 the world experienced a form of nuclear horror it will never forget. Why did Unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear plant explode on that day? Did operator error cause it? Was design flaw the reason? Should we look deeper into the Soviet system... Read more
By Kim Scipes / 10 May 2018
New York:  Oxford University Press, 2016.  ISBN:  978-0190624712 This is an absolutely important—and brilliant—recent book by someone who knows what she’s talking about.  It is clear, thoughtful and, yes, inspiring.  It is a book that I believe should be read by every social change activist in (at least) North America.  It is written by a woman who has extensive experience in the labor movement, but who also has experience as a radical student organizer as well as a community-based activist... Read more
By Martin Donohoe / 25 April 2018
Introduction Conservative economist Milton Friedman once said, “The [only] social responsibility of business is to increase its profits.” Noam Chomsky was more blunt. He stated, “Corporations [have] no moral conscience. [They] are designed by law to be concerned only for their stockholders, and not…their stakeholders, like the community or the work force.” This essay will focus on the work force. I will address wages, benefits, sick leave, retirement savings and wealth... Read more
By Ellen Brown / 23 April 2018
Ellen Brown http://EllenBrown.com April 22, 2018 The Fed is aggressively raising interest rates, although inflation is contained, private debt is already at 150% of GDP, and rising variable rates could push borrowers into insolvency. So what is driving the Fed’s push to “tighten”? On March 31st the Federal Reserve raised its benchmark interest rate for the sixth time in 3 years and signaled its intention to raise rates twice more in 2018, aiming for a fed funds target of 3.5% by 2020. LIBOR... Read more

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More Reading Recommended by GST

By Genevieve Guenther / 28 November 2018
eople writing on climate change really like to use the word we. “We could have prevented global warming in the ’80s.” “We are emitting more carbon dioxide than ever.” “We need to ramp up solutions to the climate crisis.” That verbal tic was in full effect on Monday, after the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released its special report on the differences between 1.5 degree and 2 degree... Read more
By Jonathan Latham / 27 November 2018
Tthe Gates Foundation recently started Ceres2030, a Cornell University-based project to capture the science and drive the policy agenda of agriculture and development. Ceres2030 has purchased a forthcoming special issue of prestigious Nature magazine that it will populate with articles and authors of its own choosing. These articles will in turn be used for future... Read more
By Ken Roseboro / 26 November 2018
An insightful followup interview with former GMO researcher Caius Rommens, who recently declared his blight- and bruise-resistant GMO potatoes to be a likely health hazard. Should be read to accompany Rommens' own article.
By Caius Rommens / 26 November 2018
A former GMO researcher for Monsanto and JR Simplot reveals why the GMO potatoes he helped develop for Simplot are likely hazardous to health and should be pulled from the market.
By Sam Bliss / 26 November 2018
A summary report from the first DegrowUS gathering, September 28-30 2018 in Chicago.
By Sam Bliss / 26 November 2018
In June, the author was invited to speak at the eight annual Breakthrough Dialogue, an annual invite-only conference where accomplished thinkers debate how to achieve prosperity for humans and nature. The Breakthrough Institute, an ecomodernist think-tank, apparently welcomed his presence as a provocateur.
By Brian Czech / 26 November 2018
How ironic for the Washington Post to opine “Earth may have no tomorrow” and, two pages later, offer up the mini-bios of William Nordhaus and Paul Romer, described as Nobel Prize winners. Without more rigorous news coverage, few indeed will know that Nordhaus and Romer are epitomes of neoclassical economics, that 20th century occupation isolated from the realities of natural science. Nordhaus... Read more

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