GST Original Articles

By Steve Early / 24 May 2017
The Greening of City Hall In a California Refinery TownLate-twentieth-century Richmond, CA. mirrored the postindustrial desolation of former manufacturing centers in the Rust Belt. Once prosperous and bustling, the city now suffered from high levels of unemployment, poverty, family disintegration, street crime, and violence. In neighborhoods where residential housing and industrial activity once coexisted, factory owners packed up and fled, just like local... Read more
By William Hawes / 18 May 2017
It’s time for us as a people to come together, to form an understanding about our natural environment, and our connection to it. If we are to survive long into this century and beyond, our society will have to learn to re-indigenize itself. This will be a painful process for those dependent on creature comforts, on the electrical grid’s continuous power supply, on the streams of TV, Netflix, even the internet itself, on factory-made pharmaceuticals, etc. It will be difficult for those whose... Read more
By Brian Tokar / 28 April 2017
Simultaneously published in The Indypendent (NYC), May 2017 issue, available at https://indypendent.org/: Climate Diplomacy and Climate Action:  What’s Next?
    Brian Tokar
Just over a year ago, diplomats from around the world were celebrating the final ratification of the December 2016 Paris Agreement, proclaimed to be the first globally inclusive step toward a meaningful climate solution. The agreement was praised as one of President Obama’s signature accomplishments... Read more
By Chellis Glendenning / 22 April 2017
The reader of How the World Breaks: Life in Catastrophe's Path, From the Caribbean to Siberia must be agile. The book demands that one navigate between several modes of consciousness in order to face the reality of human input into the “weather on steroids” that is routine these days. How the World Breaks takes us on a long tour, but not one launched with vacation or adventure in mind; rather it books us in at one disaster site, then another, and another. Led by our worthy guides, we visit... Read more

Pages

More Reading Recommended by GST

By Russell Mokhiber / 24 November 2017
Residents of a small town in West Virginia are approached by land agents for a gas pipeline company. The residents are told that unless they sign over their property rights to the pipeline company, the company will use eminent domain to take it. The residents begin to organize to defeat the pipeline. Mainstream environmental groups hear about the fight and latch on. Just before one of the first... Read more
By Carla Skandier / 19 November 2017
Carla Skandier points out that public ownership of the fossil fuel industry is necessary to combat global warming.
By Bronislaw Szerszynski / 18 November 2017
"The ‘eco-’ prefix refers to their recognition that 'humanity must shrink its impacts on the environment to make more room for nature.' Here, they seem to align with the direction of travel of the wider environmental movement. Yet the ‘-modernist’ half of their name firmly asserts their belief that if this is to happen, it will not come about through any slowing or reversal of the modernisation... Read more
By Richard Heinberg / 17 November 2017
News reports tell of the devastation left by a direct hit from Category 4 Hurricane Maria. Puerto Ricans already coping with damage from Hurricane Irma, which grazed the island just days before, were slammed with an even stronger storm on September 20, bringing more than a foot of rain and maximum sustained winds of at least 140 miles per hour. There is still no electricity—and likely won’t be... Read more
By Chad Hanson and Mike Garrity / 15 November 2017
A number of politicians have promised to weaken environmental laws and increase logging, supposedly to stop forest fires. Here’s what they aren’t telling you. Fires, including large fires, are a natural and ecologically necessary part of forests in the Northern Rockies. Dozens of plant and animal species, such as the black-backed Woodpecker, depend upon post-fire habitat—including patches of... Read more
By Natasha Heenan / 14 November 2017
Natasha Heenan's review of Silvia Federici's "Caliban & the Witch" explores the intersection between the development of capitalism and the 16th and 17th century witch trials.
By Elizabeth Kolbert / 13 November 2017
Carbon Engineering, a company owned in part by Bill Gates, has its headquarters on a spit of land that juts into Howe Sound, an hour north of Vancouver. Until recently, the land was a toxic-waste site, and the company’s equipment occupies a long, barnlike building that, for many years, was used to process contaminated water. The offices, inherited from the business that poisoned the site, provide... Read more

Pages