GST Original Articles

By Martin Donohoe / 22 February 2018
The History and Consequences of War The history of war begins approximately 13,000 to 10,000 years ago, with the advent of agriculture and the subsequent development of non-migratory populations, the division of labor, and the development of class structures, specifically the rise of a warrior class supported by these populations’ leadership and citizens as a means of both further enrichment and protection. Over time, weapons became increasingly sophisticated. Bronze weapons and armor were... Read more
By Martin Donohoe / 22 February 2018
Introduction In the mid nineteenth century, English social reformer Edwin Chadwick established an association between appalling living conditions and poor health. Soon thereafter, Rudolph Virchow, the founder of both modern pathology and the field of social medicine, recognized the link between rising rates of infectious disease and crowded, poorly maintained housing. In the absence of diagnostic tools and effective treatments for rampant infectious diseases, many of the... Read more
By Lisi Krall / 14 February 2018
Stan Cox recently published several articles making the unpopular argument that confronting the problem of climate change with any commitment to energy justice, social justice, and any reasonable expectation for retaining necessary ecological balances, cycles and integrity will require that we think about limits when it comes to energy production and consumption [1].  He and his son Paul rightly point out that discussions embraced by the leaders of the climate movement promise “a cornucopian... Read more
By Henry Robertson / 11 February 2018
Robots will take over the world, maybe soon. This is a view held by eminent scientists like Stephen Hawking and James Lovelock. Physicists and engineers are building artificial intelligences (AIs) that are smarter than we are, but they’re still computers. Will they be able to develop consciousness and a sense of their own self-interest? If our AI scientists are going to stave off robot rebellion, they’ll need to use whatever edge they still have over their creatures to program them with goals... Read more

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More Reading Recommended by GST

By Jason Hickel / 16 January 2019
Right now we are consuming about 85 billion tons of material stuff per year, exceeding the sustainable threshold by 70%.  According to the UN, our resource use will rise to at least 132 billion tons per year by 2050, and possibly as high as 180 billion tons.  It is on this basis that scientists have concluded that absolute decoupling of GDP from aggregate resource use is not possible.  But the... Read more
By Michael Corcoran / 12 January 2019
We need to see the limitations of social democracy. It is designed to preserve and contain capitalism, not to confront it.
By Jason Hickel / 10 January 2019
With a life expectancy of 79.1 years and levels of wellbeing in the top 7% of the world, Costa Rica matches many Scandinavian nations in these areas and far outperforms the United States. And it manages all of this with a GDP per capita of only $11,000, one fifth that of the US.  In this sense, Costa Rica is one of the most efficient economies on Earth: it produces high standards of living with... Read more
By Nathaniel Dolton-Thornton / 04 January 2019
In the early 1970s, when a young Elem girl started to have convulsions a local doctor said were caused by mercury poisoning, the Elem realized there might be a connection between the high rate of health problems in their small community and the mine next door.
By Subhankar Banerjee / 03 January 2019
If you’ve been paying attention to what’s happening to the nonhuman life forms with which we share this planet, you’ve likely heard the term “the Sixth Extinction.” If not, look it up.  After all, a superb environmental reporter, Elizabeth Kolbert, has already gotten a Pulitzer Prize for writing a book with that title.
By Sarah Anderson / 29 December 2018
My mother’s father was a North Dakota postal employee, so on Christmas Eve, she never knew when he would get home. He was determined to keep working, my mom would tell us, “until every Christmas package that could be delivered would be delivered.” He started working for the Postal Service in 1911, and family lore has it that he sometimes had to trudge through the snow on horseback to deliver the... Read more

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