GST Original Articles

By Don Fitz / 29 August 2017
A Most Bizarre Green Party Convention by Don Fitz Happenings at the first Missouri Green Party (MOGP) convention since it obtained ballot status were unusual, to say the least. They issue warnings to state Green Parties across the US as well as for any group that seeks to empower members to make decisions collectively. While Green Parties in several states lost their ballot status in the 2016 elections, Missouri may be the only one that obtained ballot status for the first time.... Read more
By Robert Jensen / 18 June 2017
Naomi Klein understands that President Donald J. Trump is a problem, but he is not the problem. In her new book, No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump’s Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need, Klein reminds us to pay attention not only to the style in which Trump governs (a multi-ring circus so routinely corrupt and corrosive that it normalizes anti-democratic practices) but in whose interests he governs (the wealthy, those he believes to be the rightful winners in the capitalist cage match... Read more
By R. Burke / 09 June 2017
While Ralph Milliband has been dead since May 1994, the relevance of his work only grows. His posthumously published book Socialism for a Skeptical Age provided a well argued defense of one of the most traditional goals of the socialist movement, public ownership, at a time in which capitalism was enjoying a brief, illusory moment of triumphalism. In that book Milliband was concerned with what Alec Nove had called “feasible socialism,” that is a socialism which could conceivably be achieved... Read more
By Stan Cox / 27 May 2017
350.org sees the "100 by '50 Act" as a Washington record-breaker, "the most ambitious piece of climate legislation Congress has ever seen.” But even if it does actually clear that decidedly low bar, it threatens to bog down efforts at preventing climate catastrophe. A climate bill known as the “100 by '50 Act” (S.987), introduced last month by U.S. Senators Jeff Merkley and Bernie Sanders, is being hailed as an important step in the fight against greenhouse warming. The leading climate... Read more

Pages

More Reading Recommended by GST

By Jonathan Cook / 05 December 2017
A ban by Israel on herding black goats – on the pretext they cause environmental damage – is to be repealed after nearly seven decades of enforcement that has decimated the pastoral traditions of Palestinian communities. The Israeli government appears to have finally conceded that, in an age of climate change, the threat of forest fires to Israeli communities is rapidly growing in the goats’... Read more
By Andrew Hartman / 04 December 2017
Andrew Hartman examines the life and career of John Reed, author of Ten Days that Shook the World.
By Eric Blanc / 04 December 2017
Eric Blanc discusses the history of the Minnesota Farmer-Labor party as showing why socialists ultimately need to break with the Democratic party.
By Jeremy Lent / 02 December 2017
Imagine you’re driving your shiny new car too fast along a wet, curvy road. You turn a corner and realize you’re heading straight for a crowd of pedestrians. If you slam on your brakes, you’d probably skid and damage your car. So you keep your foot on the accelerator, heading straight for the crowd, knowing they’ll be killed and maimed, but if you keep driving fast enough no-one will be able to... Read more
By Christy Thornton / 02 December 2017
The horrifying coincidence of this week’s devastating earthquake in central Mexico, coming on the 32nd anniversary of the temblor that killed more than 10,000 people in 1985, has led observers and survivors to draw constant parallels between the two disasters. But if the corruption and ineffectiveness of the state took some by surprise in 1985, unraveling the last threads of legitimacy of PRI... Read more
By Simon Granovsky-Larsen / 30 November 2017
It is late in the rainy season, and two community water defenders and I stand at the edge of the Río Bolo in coastal Retalhuleu. Above us tower the remains of a concrete bridge where people from the community of El Rosario used to cross this once tremendous river. Today, the water flows barely two feet deep. Campesinos easily cross the river on foot as we talk, the water barely reaching their... Read more
By Douglas Haynes / 30 November 2017
From increasingly frequent storms to food insecurity, Nicaragua has been hard-hit by the impacts of climate change. In the wake of Hurricane Harvey and facing Hurricane Irma, we can learn from their response.

Pages