GST Original Articles

By Don Fitz / 30 June 2016
In the middle of June 2016 the US House Committee on Natural Resources approved HR 3650, an effort to expand privatization of public lands. The bill would transfer control of “up to 2 million acres of eligible portions of the National Forest System” from the federal to state governments. Since state governments cannot afford firefighting budgets for such huge pieces of land, the law is a slick maneuver to make certain that lands will end up in the hands of private corporations. Endgame:... Read more
By R. Burke / 04 June 2016
When socialism first appeared as a modern political movement, it did so in a form that later came to be termed as ‘utopian.’ Charles Fourier, Robert Owen, Henri de Saint-Simon, and later Pierre Joseph Proudhon all strove to put forward plans and policies that they hoped would lead to a better, more desirable world. Such thinkers attempted to convince their fellow citizens of the wisdom of their plans, and that doing so would lead to the realization of their ideas. Marx and Engels, who would... Read more
By Stan Cox and Paul Cox / 27 May 2016
Ten years ago this Sunday, May 29, one of the weirdest and most controversial disasters of the 2000s struck a densely populated area just outside the city of Sidoarjo in East Java, Indonesia. At 5:00 that morning, a slurry of dark gray mud burst from the soil and began oozing slowly across the landscape. Since that day, the flow of mud has never stopped or even paused.
  Now, a decade into the eruption, an area of almost three square miles has been buried in mud up to sixty feet deep. At... Read more
By Don Fitz / 27 May 2016
But Will It Last? Historic Preservation Wins Big in U City by Don Fitz An April 2016 victory in University City MO saw all three progressive councilpersons winning as well as over 69% voting “Yes” on an unusual amendment to the city charter. Proposition H would require the city to obtain voter approval before disposing of historic buildings. The effort started out as an attempt to block a developer. Then it expanded to protect multiple “heritage sites.” It expanded again into... Read more

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More Reading Recommended by GST

By Jim Scheff / 07 July 2018
A few weeks ago, my wife and I were backpacking on the Sheltowee Trace National Recreation Trail along Rock Creek in McCreary County when we came across a fellow hiker who’d traveled from Indiana to hike Kentucky’s long trail. After some talk of footwear choices and blisters, she remarked on the astounding beauty of the place. “We don’t have anything like this,” she said.
Read more here:... Read more
By Chantal Mouffe / 06 July 2018
Chantal Mouffe argues that Jeremy Corbyn represents the success of left populism. 
By Ellen Brown / 05 July 2018
There is serious consideration of establishing a State Bank in California--the fifth largest economy in the world--to enable the state bank to both serve their population and add income to the state's budget.  Interestingly, this is being advocated by leading politicians in the state, people who have serious popular support.
By Chris Wright / 05 July 2018
I often have occasion to think that, as an “intellectual,” I’m very lucky to be alive at this time in history, at the end of the long evolution from Herodotus and the pre-Socratic philosophers to Chomsky and modern science. One reason for my gratitude is simply that, as I wrote long ago in a moment of youthful idealism, “the past is a kaleidoscope of cultural achievements, or rather a cornucopian... Read more
By Ned Rozell / 04 July 2018
Thawing permafrost is a slow-motion disaster happening now in most of northern Alaska. Unlike a hurricane or a flood, the loss of permafrost is silent, rarely dramatic, and never fatal.
By Nathanael Johnson / 04 July 2018
The low boreal forest that spans the border between Alaska and Canada is the home of the Gwich’in people. There are some 6,000 Gwich’in, hunting and raising their children in villages at the edge of the Arctic Circle. They’ve been there for thousands of years, following the caribou, which provide a majority of their diet, even today. Bernadette Demientieff, executive director of the Gwich’in... Read more
By Robert Hunziker / 02 July 2018
Stuart Scott of Climate Matters.TV recently interviewed Dr. Peter Wadhams, emeritus professor, Polar Ocean Physics, Cambridge University and author of the acclaimed highly recommended: A Farewell To Ice (Oxford University Press, 2017). In response to the question “what’s your assessment of the state of the climate,” Dr. Wadhams replied: “Well, first of all, what I see is an acceleration of... Read more

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