GST Original Articles

By Robert Hunziker / 07 September 2019
The oceans are crying for mercy, a fact that is starkly revealed in a telling 900-page draft of a forthcoming UN report due for release September 25. The draft report obtained by Agence France-Presse (AFP) assesses the status of the oceans and cryosphere. It’s a landmark UN report, and it’s not a pretty picture. In the final analysis, the report amounts to self-destruction that’s largely ignored by most of the leading countries throughout the world. It’s all about greenhouse gassing as a... Read more
By Henry Robertson / 29 August 2019
    Use less energyEat less meatCultivate your gardenPlant treesLearn the Law of Limits
Earth’s climate is turning against life in its current configuration. This is going to be bad for most creatures, notably us, which is fitting because humanity is the culprit. You probably don’t feel personally responsible. All of us in the overdeveloped parts of the world were born into a society so thoroughly built on fossil fuels that it can’t last a day without them. If you’re conscientious about it... Read more
By Robert Hunziker / 18 August 2019
Sea level has been stable, at current levels, throughout recorded history for 5,000 years. That’s about to change. Still, it’s very difficult for people to imagine a change in sea level after 5,000 years of rock solid stability. Nevertheless, assuming sea levels do rise markedly, one of the biggest questions of the century is whether the world is prepared for sea level rise?  As a guess, the answer is: No, not even close. Well, they better start making plans because there’s no stopping at... Read more
By Ellen Brown / 10 August 2019
When the Federal Reserve cut interest rates on July 31stfor the first time in more than a decade, commentators were asking why. According to official data, the economy was rebounding, unemployment was below 4%, and GDP growth was above 3%. If anything, by the Fed’s own reasoning, it should have been raising rates.  The explanationof market pundits was that we’re in a trade war and a currency war. Other central banks were cutting their rates and the Fed had to follow suit, in order to prevent... Read more

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More Reading Recommended by GST

By RDN Reports / 16 October 2019
By 2050, up to six million tons of solar panel waste will need recycling, and the United States is expected to have the second largest amount of waste after China, according to the International Renewable Energy Agency. But few states have started processes for handling the waste even as they require more energy produced by renewable sources.
By David Roberts / 12 October 2019
Heavy industry is responsible for around 22 percent of global CO2 emissions. Forty-two percent of that — about 10 percent of global emissions — comes from combustion to produce large amounts of high-temperature heat for industrial products like cement, steel, and petrochemicals. To put that in perspective, industrial heat’s 10 percent is greater than the CO2 emissions of all the world’s cars (6... Read more
By ETH Zurich / 11 October 2019
Around 0.9 billion hectares of land worldwide would be suitable for reforestation, which could ultimately capture two thirds of human-made carbon emissions. A study shows that shows this would be the most effective method to combat climate change.
By Kate Yoder / 06 October 2019
The Department of Defense spews so much greenhouse gas every year that it would rank as the 55th worst polluter in the world if it were a country, beating out Sweden, Denmark, and Portugal, according to a new paper from Brown University’s Costs of War project. The irony is that the military is concerned about what will happen as the world keeps heating up. Last year, the Department of Defense... Read more
By Molly Bergen / 05 October 2019
Stretching across Central Africa, the Congo Basin is home to 80 million people who depend on it for everything from food to charcoal to medicinal plants. But they aren’t the only ones; the world’s second-largest rainforest also plays a role in regulating rainfall patterns across other parts of the continent. Its continued disappearance could exacerbate insecurity of freshwater and food supplies... Read more
By Elias König / 03 October 2019
Mauna Kea shows that science does not happen in a vacuum. It leaves very real traces in the world — from the desecration of Native land at Mauna Kea to the atomic bomb. A science that is not reflective of questions such as for whom is it gathering knowledge, at what cost is it doing so, and what ways of life it is destroying, is perpetuating the kind of positivist thinking that has significantly... Read more
By Lital Khaikin / 02 October 2019
Mongolia’s Action Plan for Implementation of the Green Development Policy ... The Green Development Policy also presents hydroelectric development as the next step for Mongolia to transition from fossil fuels. The Selenge River is considered a transboundary body of water under UN protocol. Originating in northern Mongolia, the Selenge River has Ramsar protected wetland status and is an integral... Read more

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