GST Original Articles

By Stan Cox and Paul Cox / 14 March 2019
Abandoned by their country, residents refuse to accept the idea that they will never recover. Nearly a year and a half after Hurricane Maria, about three-fourths of the houses in the Sierra Brava neighborhood of Salinas, Puerto Rico stand battered and empty. Some families left because their homes were rendered uninhabitable and they had no money to fix them. Others left because they lost their jobs. In responding to Maria, federal agencies had hired some local people, but... Read more
By R. Burke / 06 March 2019
Those of us familiar with the 1964 Stanley Kubrick movie Dr. Strangelove or: How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Bomb know the story. An Air Force general looses his mind and orders a nuclear strike against the U.S.S.R. in order to preserve the “purity of essence of our bodily fluids” threatened by fluoridation. The movie begins with a disclaimer: “it is the stated position of the U.S. Air Force that their safeguards would prevent the occurrence of such events as are depicted in this... Read more
By Eva María / 17 February 2019
Gonzalo Gómez is a Venezuelan revolutionary, member of the socialist organization Marea Socialista and co-founder of the independent left-wing website aporrea.org. He was interviewed by Eva María, and the interview was translated by Alejandro Q.  This interview was first published by International Viewpoint on February 6, 2019. Note from the interviewer and the editors of International Viewpoint: This interview was conducted on January 27 with Goméz, a leading voice of Venezuela’s Marea... Read more
By Robert Hunziker / 16 February 2019
Capitalism not only owns global warming, there’s a big red mitigation arrow pointed at the heart of today’s rampant capitalism, which is eerily similar to the loosie goosie version of the Roaring Twenties, but with a high tech twist.  After all, somebody’s got to pony-up for climate change/global warming mitigation. Who better than deep pocket capitalists? For historical perspective:  Today’s brand of capitalism runs circles around the Eisenhower 1950s with its 90% top marginal tax rate... Read more

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More Reading Recommended by GST

By Paul Mason / 18 July 2019
The left that’s emerged since 2008 is, in reality, an alliance of two projects: a rearguard action by the old working class of the carbon era, against austerity, atomisation and a falling wage share; and an offensive by the diverse, educated workforce of the information era to advance individual rights and social liberalisation. One project is about setting right the injustices of the carbon era... Read more
By Federico Fuentes / 17 July 2019
Within hours of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó calling for street mobilisations to back his attempted military coup against President Nicolás Maduro on April 30, Guaidó’s supporters had looted and set fire to the headquarters of the Indio Caricuao Commune in south-west Caracas. The building was used for local residents’ meetings and housed a commune-run textile enterprise, which funds... Read more
By Georgina Downs / 16 July 2019
Some people may have never heard the word ‘organophosphates’ to know what they are and what they do. Others may have only heard of organophosphates in relation to nerve agent chemical attacks – such as the one in Tokyo in 1995 where sarinwas released on three lines of the Tokyosubway during rush hour, killing 12 people, severely injuring 50 (some of whom later died), and causing vision problems... Read more
By R S Anthion / 15 July 2019
Two decades ago Nato started its 78 day bombing campaign against Yugoslavia. Using the language of peace and humanitarianism Nato dismembered Yugoslavia killing more civilians than they did soldiers. A non-stop aerial assault on the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia using more than a thousand Nato warplanes delivering 2,000 air-strikes in 40,000 sorties and with over 20,000 bombs dropped on the... Read more
By Tamara Pearson / 13 July 2019
Mexico is the biggest beer exporter globally, but it barely has enough water for its residents and farmers. Experiencing long-lasting droughts, the country, which is half desert, has become a cheap place for transnationals to consume its remaining water, then send the products and profits to wealthier regions. The amount of water that goes into producing a gallon of beer is key as to why beer... Read more
By Rosemary Mason and Colin Todhunter / 10 July 2019
An Open Letter to Hon Michael Gove Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs It seems likely that a post-Brexit trade deal with the US could mean more of the same and lead to the introduction of GM crops in the UK alongside the lowering of standards for the use of biocides in agriculture. Sainsbury Laboratory already has plans for a new open air field trial of... Read more
By Joan Roelofs / 07 July 2019
At Fort Benning, Georgia, home of the “Maneuver School of Excellence,” (as well as the notorious School of the Americas, now renamed the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation), live-fire and other training was threatened by threatened species and their habitats. Now the base and its partners are restoring habitat and offering contiguous land for buyers who would use the land for... Read more

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