GST Original Articles

By Don Fitz / 12 April 2016
A review of John M. Kirk's Health Care without Borders: Understanding Cuban Medical Internationalism. When the Ebola virus began to spread through western Africa in fall 2014, much of the world panicked. Soon, over 20,000 people were infected, more than 8,000 had died, and worries mounted that the death toll could reach into hundreds of thousands. The United States provided military support; other countries promised money. Cuba was the first nation to respond with what was most needed... Read more
By Stan Cox / 10 April 2016
Five-plus years after the publication of Dickson Despommier's book The Vertical Farm: Feeding Ourselves and The World in the 21st Century, his dream—originally conceived as the production of food in the interior of tall urban buildings—is gaining momentum despite many unanswered questions about its feasibility. Although the fanciful skyscrapers depicted in countless architectural renderings of vertical farms have never materialized in the real world, less ambitious indoor food-growing... Read more
By R. Burke / 05 April 2016
A review by R. Burke of Nick Srnicek & Alex Williams' Inventing the Future; Postcapitalism and a World Without Work. A necessary ingredient for the success of the world-left is a cultural climate of modernism. We may debate exactly when the period of modernism begins, but referencing the history of Western Art can help us to define it. From its beginnings with the realism of Courbet in the mid-nineteenth century, to its’ golden age with surrealism in the mid-twentieth century, modernism... Read more
By Stan Cox / 27 March 2016
A Review of Brian Tokar's book Toward Climate Justice: Perspectives on the Climate Crisis and Social Justice (Porsgrunn, Norway: New Compass Press, 2014). This expanded edition of Brian Tokar's book is a concise, valuable summing-up of the most important issue facing humanity today: how to stop runaway climate chaos while at the same time achieving justice in the distribution of economic power, resources, and the hard work of ecological renewal, both within and among countries. The first... Read more

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More Reading Recommended by GST

By Mark Allen / 20 March 2018
Three California courts have ruled three giant paint companies knowingly promoted a toxic product that has poisoned thousands of children and ordered them to clean it up. The paint companies have a cynical scheme to get Californians to pay the bill. On February 14, the Supreme Court of California declined to review a multimillion-dollar state appeals court ruling against three of this country’s... Read more
By Eliza Egret and Tom Anderson / 19 March 2018
Activists from Australia and beyond are joining forces to prevent what is set to be one of the world’s biggest ecological catastrophes. The massive Carmichael coal mega-mine will devastate the Great Barrier Reef, contribute massively to global climate change, and further marginalise Australia’s First Nations people.
By Gunnar Rundgren / 19 March 2018
It is possible to feed more than 9 billion people with organic production methods with a small increase in the required crop acreage and with decreased greenhouse gas emission. But this assumes considerable reduction in food wastage and in the quantities of feed grown to animals. Picture: Ann-Helen Meyer von BremenThat is the conclusion in the paper Strategies for feeding the world more... Read more
By Bryan Miranda / 18 March 2018
A march against Shell and Exxon’s gas drilling drew thousands in the northern Dutch city of Groningen on Jan. 19, after a heavy earthquake rocked the region earlier this month. Ten thousand people — a record number for Groningen — marched through the city with torches and chanted slogans scolding the government, as well as its partners Shell and Exxon, for the gas operations they say are... Read more
By Javier Sethness / 18 March 2018
Javier Sethness interviews science fiction novelist Kim Stanley Robinson about the post-capitalist future explored in his books.
By Kristin Ross / 18 March 2018
Kristin Ross discusses how the Paris Commune remains valuable as a resource for anti-systtemic movements today.
By David Istvan / 10 March 2018
Settled agriculture, cities, nation-states, information technology and every other facet of the modern world have unfolded within a long era of climatic good fortune. Those days are gone. Sea levels are rising; climate is becoming less stable; average temperatures are increasing. Civilization emerged in a geological era known as the Holocene. Some have called our new climate era the Anthropocene... Read more

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