GST Original Articles

By Stan Cox / 11 May 2016
Richard Nixon's agriculture secretary in the early to mid-1970s was Earl Butz, a man best known for advising the nation's farmers to “get big or get out.” And rural America has been following that advice ever since. Across most of the country, farms continue to grow in acreage and dwindle in number. Every state in the vast agricultural region stretching from Michigan to Kansas and Ohio to North Dakota has seen more than a doubling of average farm size since 1982. Meanwhile, U.S. Department of... Read more
By Don Fitz / 12 April 2016
A review of John M. Kirk's Health Care without Borders: Understanding Cuban Medical Internationalism. When the Ebola virus began to spread through western Africa in fall 2014, much of the world panicked. Soon, over 20,000 people were infected, more than 8,000 had died, and worries mounted that the death toll could reach into hundreds of thousands. The United States provided military support; other countries promised money. Cuba was the first nation to respond with what was most needed... Read more
By Stan Cox / 10 April 2016
Five-plus years after the publication of Dickson Despommier's book The Vertical Farm: Feeding Ourselves and The World in the 21st Century, his dream—originally conceived as the production of food in the interior of tall urban buildings—is gaining momentum despite many unanswered questions about its feasibility. Although the fanciful skyscrapers depicted in countless architectural renderings of vertical farms have never materialized in the real world, less ambitious indoor food-growing... Read more
By R. Burke / 05 April 2016
A review by R. Burke of Nick Srnicek & Alex Williams' Inventing the Future; Postcapitalism and a World Without Work. A necessary ingredient for the success of the world-left is a cultural climate of modernism. We may debate exactly when the period of modernism begins, but referencing the history of Western Art can help us to define it. From its beginnings with the realism of Courbet in the mid-nineteenth century, to its’ golden age with surrealism in the mid-twentieth century, modernism... Read more

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More Reading Recommended by GST

By Dr. Matthew Quest / 16 January 2018
Published 60 years ago, Frazier’s The Black Bourgeoisie (1957)analyzed the social and political behavior of the African American middle class social strata that aspired to purportedly benevolently rule their own community while pursuing their own personal advancement. Frazier saw the Black bourgeoisie as both an evolving middle class in historical materialist terms – that is, in the context of... Read more
By Joshua Frank / 15 January 2018
It’s a typical summer day in the desert of Southern California. Very little breeze and blazing, unforgiving heat. We’re in the Mojave on an excursion to find the ruins of Llano del Rio, a socialist colony that sprouted up here in 1914. The temperature is well over 100 and it feels even hotter. As we drive past barren fields, a few groves of Joshua Trees and miles upon miles of scrub brush along... Read more
By Frances Moore Lappé / 13 January 2018
Frances Moore Lappe demonstrates that capitalism, and the energy-intensive industrial farming it promotes, can't feed the world. There are however alternatives that are efficient, sustainable, democratic, and egalitarian.
By Arturo Desimone / 12 January 2018
Arturo Desimone relates the story of Dr Bhimrao Ambedkar, who challenged Gandhi's support for the caste system.
By Katrina Kozarek / 10 January 2018
Over the years we have all heard a great deal about the great social achievements of the Bolivarian Revolution, the government subsidized health program Barrio Adentro, the subsidized food program Mercal, the housing mission which provides free and affordable government organized housing to the poor and middle class, the Canaima program which provides computer to students, Madres del Barrio and... Read more
By Jason Hickel / 07 January 2018
"If we want to have any hope of averting catastrophe, we’re going to have to do something about our addiction to growth." Earlier this summer, a paper published in the journal Nature captured headlines with a rather bleak forecast. Our chances of keeping global warming below the 2C danger threshold are very, very small: only about 5%. The reason, according to the paper’s authors, is that the... Read more
By Stephen Corry / 05 January 2018
How intertwined are governments and big conservation NGOs? And to what extent do they view fundamental human rights - particularly for powerless minorities - through a lens of self-interest tinted by self-delusion? And what happens when they're challenged? Survival International is closer to some answers after engaging with a process devised by the Organization for Economic Cooperation &... Read more

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