GST Original Articles

By Richard Burke / 13 November 2015
A review by R. Burke of Tariq Ali's The Extreme Centre: A Warning. Debates about "reform versus revolution" on the Socialist Left are by now more than a century old. Yet it seems that the political climate at this time is one in which even the revisionists of the German Social Democratic Party of Germany in the early 20th century would be considered to be "too radical" to be taken seriously as a political alternative! How have we come to a point where even ‘socialist' and ‘labor' parties are... Read more

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More Reading Recommended by GST

By Ramzy Baroud / 11 November 2017
To a certain extent, Aung San Suu Kyi is a false prophet. Glorified by the west for many years, she was made a ‘democracy icon’ because she opposed the same forces in her country, Burma,  at the time as the US-led western coalition that was isolating Rangoon for its alliance with China. Aung San Suu Kyi played her role as expected, winning the approval of the Right and the admiration of the Left... Read more
By Shelley Connor / 09 November 2017
The number of people suffering from malnutrition worldwide rose to 815 million in 2016, rising by 38 million from the year before. According to a new report co-signed by five United Nations agencies and charities, and made public by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the UN (FAOUN) on Friday, this was the first such year-to-year increase since the beginning of the 21st century. The... Read more
By John Bellamy Foster / 03 November 2017
The prevailing liberal approach to ecological problems, including climate change, has long put capital accumulation before people and the planet. It is maintained that through new technologies, demographic shifts (such as population control), and the mechanisms of the global “free market,” the existing system can successfully address the immense ecological challenges before us. In short, the... Read more
By Alan Broughton / 29 October 2017
The term Green Revolution refers to the introduction of high-yielding varieties of staple food crops, particularly wheat and rice, into Third World countries, starting in the 1960s. Initially Mexico, India and the Philippines were targeted. The stated aim was to increase food production to end hunger and prevent uprisings. The Green Revolution did increase agricultural production, and no more... Read more
By JIM CREEGAN / 26 October 2017
The beginning of the American New Left is usually dated from the appearance of the Port Huron Statement in 1962 . Drawn up by a handful of members of Students or a Democratic Society (SDS) at a conference in the Michigan town it is named for, the statement is an expression of the  growing discontent of middle-class students–“raised in modest comfort”, in their words–with the social and political... Read more
By Moira Birss / 22 October 2017
As threats to the environment increase across Latin America, new laws and police practices take aim against the front line activists defending their land and resources. Berta Cáceres, assassinated in her home on March 3, 2016, was just one of hundreds of Latin American environmental activists attacked in recent years. At least 577 environmental human rights defenders (EHRDs) were killed in Latin... Read more
By Thea Riofrancos / 19 October 2017
On March 8, 2012, a few hundred marchers set out from Pangui, Ecuador, a town in the southeastern Amazon, near the construction site of the massive, open-pit Mirador Mine. Just days earlier, a consortium of Chinese state-owned companies had signed a contract to exploit the mine’s copper reserves, the first agreement of its kind in the country’s history.The demonstrators zigzagged through the... Read more

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