GST Original Articles

By Don Fitz / 09 March 2018
Democratic Production and the Workers' Opposition of Revolutionary Russia (Part 1) by Don Fitz In a post-capitalist society, who should control production? How should decisions about worklife be made? Who should decide what is produced, where it is produced and how it is exchanged within a country and between countries? For the first time in history, the great Russian Revolution of 1917 had to confront these issues in more than a theoretical way. The issues... Read more
By Priti Gulati Cox / 22 February 2018
The Palestinian cause is not just for Palestinians, not even just for Arabs. The Palestinian cause is a humanitarian cause. What makes me happy is to see the humanitarians of the world stand with us in solidarity to free our land. — Ahed Tamimi, Empire Files: Abby Martin Meets Ahed Tamimi—Message From A Freedom Fighter. In 1976, the Palestinian villages of Nabi Saleh and Deir Nidham were encroached upon by Israeli settlers, and their ever-expanding colony of Halamish was born. In December... Read more
By Stan Cox / 22 February 2018
Stanford professor Mark Jacobson and his colleagues have written yet another paper purporting to show that 100 percent of energy demand can be fulfilled by wind, solar, and hydroelectric generation. This latest study, which comes in the form of a manuscript accepted but not yet published by the journal Renewable Energy, seeks to show how that goal can be met in 139 nations. Jacobson’s previous “100 percent renewable” papers have prompted other researchers to publish their own studies... Read more
By Martin Donohoe / 22 February 2018
The History and Consequences of War The history of war begins approximately 13,000 to 10,000 years ago, with the advent of agriculture and the subsequent development of non-migratory populations, the division of labor, and the development of class structures, specifically the rise of a warrior class supported by these populations’ leadership and citizens as a means of both further enrichment and protection. Over time, weapons became increasingly sophisticated. Bronze weapons and armor were... Read more

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More Reading Recommended by GST

By Subhankar Banerjee / 03 January 2019
If you’ve been paying attention to what’s happening to the nonhuman life forms with which we share this planet, you’ve likely heard the term “the Sixth Extinction.” If not, look it up.  After all, a superb environmental reporter, Elizabeth Kolbert, has already gotten a Pulitzer Prize for writing a book with that title.
By Sarah Anderson / 29 December 2018
My mother’s father was a North Dakota postal employee, so on Christmas Eve, she never knew when he would get home. He was determined to keep working, my mom would tell us, “until every Christmas package that could be delivered would be delivered.” He started working for the Postal Service in 1911, and family lore has it that he sometimes had to trudge through the snow on horseback to deliver the... Read more
By Kris De Decker / 27 December 2018
The circular economy – the newest magical word in the sustainable development vocabulary – promises economic growth without destruction or waste. However, the concept only focuses on a small part of total resource use and does not take into account the laws of thermodynamics.
By Binoy Kampmark / 23 December 2018
All memorialised events, when passing into mythology, must be seen critically. In some cases, there should be more than a hint of suspicion. The Christmas Truce of 1914 remains one sentimentalised occasion, remembered less to scold the mad mechanised forces of death led by regressive castes than to reflect upon common humanity.
By Dana G. Smith / 22 December 2018
There are an estimated 80,000 people, mostly men, in solitary confinement in U.S. prisons. They are confined to windowless cells roughly the size of a king bed for 23 hours a day, with virtually no human contact except for brief interactions with prison guards. According to scientists speaking at the conference session, this type of social isolation and sensory deprivation can have traumatic... Read more
By Josh Farley / 20 December 2018
Perhaps the main reason people reject the need for a steady state economy is some form of cornucopianism, the belief that technological progress will overcome all ecological and physical limits, allowing endless economic growth into the indefinite future. Cornucopianism has several flavors, and I will describe three: mainstream economics, eco-modernism, and singularity theory.
By Helen Pattison / 19 December 2018
Climate change is clearly a pressing concern for the majority of working-class people. But with 71% of greenhouse gas emissions coming from 100 corporations, capitalism presents a fundamental barrier to solving the problem. After all, you can't control what you don't own. Under capitalism, production is unplanned, driven by the demands of profit. Only on the basis of public ownership of the... Read more

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