GST Original Articles

By Stan Cox / 12 October 2019
shaun2.jpg If U.S. greenhouse emissions are to be driven down to zero within a decade or even two, it will not be accomplished through building more solar and wind energy capacity and relying on market competition to eliminate fossil fuels from the economy. A direct, foolproof mechanism is required to drive oil, gas, and coal out of the economy, by law and on schedule. We need an airtight national cap on fossil fuel extraction and importation that ratchets down... Read more
By Robert Hunziker / 12 October 2019
academik.jpg  CREDIT: SHIRSHOV INSTITUTE OF OCEANOLOGY Global warming is on speed, especially in northern latitudes where an international team of scientists led by Igor Semiletov of Tomsk Polytechnic University, Russia’s oldest technical institution, recently made a startling discovery aboard the Academic Mstislav Keldysh (see photo above), the kind of discovery that sends chills down the spine, i.e., “methane bubbles boiling in water.” According to Semiletov... Read more
By Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor / 10 October 2019
https://blackagendareport.com/five-years-later-do-black-lives-matter
By R. Burke / 08 October 2019
One of the most illuminating scenes from Milton Knight’s The Young C.L.R. James: A Graphic Novelette depicts him as a seven year old. Young James is watching a cricket game excitedly from a window in his house. “Cricket was the only game.” “Our house was superbly situated, exactly behind the wicket.” His enjoyment is interrupted by a shout: “Cyril!” The voice is that of his mother, Elizabeth James. “Come away from the window. No cricket on Sunday.” Moving from the window, he picks up a copy of... Read more

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More Reading Recommended by GST

By Hedelberto Lopez Blanch / 19 October 2019
As several nations in South America are going through their worst economic-political-institutional crises, Uruguay —which has survived the neoliberal wave in the region— is going to face elections on October 27 that might change a  system that has been benefiting most of its population.
By RDN Reports / 16 October 2019
By 2050, up to six million tons of solar panel waste will need recycling, and the United States is expected to have the second largest amount of waste after China, according to the International Renewable Energy Agency. But few states have started processes for handling the waste even as they require more energy produced by renewable sources.
By David Roberts / 12 October 2019
Heavy industry is responsible for around 22 percent of global CO2 emissions. Forty-two percent of that — about 10 percent of global emissions — comes from combustion to produce large amounts of high-temperature heat for industrial products like cement, steel, and petrochemicals. To put that in perspective, industrial heat’s 10 percent is greater than the CO2 emissions of all the world’s cars (6... Read more
By ETH Zurich / 11 October 2019
Around 0.9 billion hectares of land worldwide would be suitable for reforestation, which could ultimately capture two thirds of human-made carbon emissions. A study shows that shows this would be the most effective method to combat climate change.
By Kate Yoder / 06 October 2019
The Department of Defense spews so much greenhouse gas every year that it would rank as the 55th worst polluter in the world if it were a country, beating out Sweden, Denmark, and Portugal, according to a new paper from Brown University’s Costs of War project. The irony is that the military is concerned about what will happen as the world keeps heating up. Last year, the Department of Defense... Read more
By Molly Bergen / 05 October 2019
Stretching across Central Africa, the Congo Basin is home to 80 million people who depend on it for everything from food to charcoal to medicinal plants. But they aren’t the only ones; the world’s second-largest rainforest also plays a role in regulating rainfall patterns across other parts of the continent. Its continued disappearance could exacerbate insecurity of freshwater and food supplies... Read more
By Elias König / 03 October 2019
Mauna Kea shows that science does not happen in a vacuum. It leaves very real traces in the world — from the desecration of Native land at Mauna Kea to the atomic bomb. A science that is not reflective of questions such as for whom is it gathering knowledge, at what cost is it doing so, and what ways of life it is destroying, is perpetuating the kind of positivist thinking that has significantly... Read more

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