GST Original Articles

By Kollibri terre Sonnenblume / 15 November 2019
salar_de_uyuni_lion-hirth.jpg Salar de Uyuni salt plain in Bolivia. (photo by Lion Hirth, public domain)
By Don Fitz / 01 November 2019
dam_tasmaniacrop.jpg Gordon Dam, Southwest National Park, Tasmania, Australia (2008). Creator: JJ Harrison. Via Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gordon_Dam.jpg Hydroelectric power from dams might be the thorniest question that proponents of the Green New Deal (GND) have to grapple with. Providing more energy than solar and wind combined, dams could well become the backup for energy if it proves impossible to get off of... Read more
By Kollibri terre Sonnenblume / 22 October 2019
tiehms_buckwheat_flower_patrick_donnelly_center_fpwc-cropped.jpg Tiehm’s buckwheat flower by Patrick Donnelly/Center for Biological Diversity.
In a remote corner of Nevada is a wildflower that grows nowhere else on earth. Named “Tiehm’s Buckwheat” (Eriogonum tiehmii), it has been found on only ten acres of public land in the Silver Peak Range of Esmerelda County, and is virtually unknown except to a handful of botanists. Tragically, it is at risk of... Read more
By Charles Posa McFadden and Karen Howell McFadden / 21 October 2019
We begin by way of a conclusion. The now globally dominant system through which we make our living in nature is capitalism.  But capitalism is in process of self-destruction, now rapidly undermining the natural and social conditions for its own and humanity’s further existence. If we are not to go down with it, we must construct an ecological alternative – democratic, science-based, imaginative and sustainable. In other words, a system of relations between people and with the rest of nature... Read more

Pages

More Reading Recommended by GST

By Frani Halperin / 03 November 2019
America’s reservoirs are filling up with sediment. Their storage capacity peaked in the 1980s and it’s been going downhill ever since—sometimes with disastrous consequences.
By Tara Lohan / 03 November 2019
What happens when reservoirs become rivers again and when salmon get a chance to reach their upstream limits for the first time in a century? And perhaps most importantly: What lessons from the largest-ever dam-removal project can we apply to future efforts on other rivers in the United States and around the world?
By Helen Yaffe / 31 October 2019
‘Today is Cuban workers’ day!’ a Cuban friend told me in late June, beaming at the news that all employees of the island’s ‘budgeted’ state sector would receive significant salary rises, commencing from 1 July 2019. Cuba’s budgeted sector incorporates organisations and entities which operate with a state budget and mostly provide services free to the population without returning revenue to the... Read more
By Against the Current Editors / 27 October 2019
Donald Trump is the first modern politician who’s used the U.S. presidency — as everyone knows, since the liberal media, punditry and presidential historians repeat it on a daily basis — to brazenly solicit a foreign regime’s intervention for his personal benefit in electoral politics. It’s a damning indictment of the “big twit” in the White House. It also happens to be false. The notorious... Read more
By Alexander Dunlap / 27 October 2019
Industrial-scale renewable energy does nothing to remake exploitative relationships with the earth, and instead represents the renewal and expansion of the present capitalist order.  We have inherited the bad/good energy dichotomy of fossil fuels versus renewable energy, a holdover from the environmental movement of the 1970’s that is misleading, if not false.
By Greta Moran / 26 October 2019
Earlier this month, Pacific Gas & Electric, the investor-owned utility company that supplies power to much of California, cut off electricity to over 700,000 customers. The company argued that such a drastic measure — the largest planned power outage in the state’s history — was necessary to prevent wildfires. Yet for some activists, this bleakly framed choice served as another reminder that... Read more
By Joaqlin Estus / 23 October 2019
“It's their futures. It's all of our futures and it's all of our traditions and rights and cultures to keep this land healthy and to keep our people happy. And economic growth and money is not a part of that conversation. It should only be our futures that we are worried about right now because it is urgent and it is now.”

Pages