GST Original Articles

By Ellen Brown / 18 March 2018
http://EllenBrown.com March 16, 2018 The US Postal Service, under attack from a manufactured crisis designed to force its privatization, needs a new source of funding to survive. Postal banking could fill that need. The US banking establishment has been at war with the post office since at least 1910, when the Postal Savings Bank Act established a public savings alternative to a private banking system that had crashed the economy in the Bank Panic of 1907. The American Bankers Association... Read more
By Elizabeth Fattah / 17 March 2018
Kim Konte certainly thought so. Kim was one of the organizers of Non Toxic Irvine which convinced the City of Irvine to adopt an organic-first policy in landscaping (http://www.nontoxicirvine.org/). “Baseball is my children’s life,” Komte said, “and we want to make sure every baseball player is able to slam into the dirt and roll around in the grass and not be exposed to carcinogenic chemicals.” San Diego uses glyphosate, which is better known... Read more
By Don Fitz / 14 March 2018
Democratic Production and the Workers' Opposition of Revolutionary Russia by Don Fitz In a post-capitalist society, who should control production? How should decisions about worklife be made? Who should decide what is produced, where it is produced and how it is exchanged within a country and between countries? For the first time in history, the great Russian Revolution of 1917 had to confront these issues in more than a theoretical way. The issues became... Read more
By Don Fitz / 09 March 2018
Democratic Production and the Workers' Opposition of Revolutionary Russia (Part 2) by Don Fitz [This is the second of two parts. The first section covered the origins of the Workers' Opposition (WO), interpretations of “workers' control,” the 10th Party Congress, and suppression of the WO after the congress.] The Third Meeting of the Comintern With opportunities for discussion and organization being closed out, Kollontai and Shlyapnikov... Read more

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More Reading Recommended by GST

By Sam Bliss / 26 November 2018
In June, the author was invited to speak at the eight annual Breakthrough Dialogue, an annual invite-only conference where accomplished thinkers debate how to achieve prosperity for humans and nature. The Breakthrough Institute, an ecomodernist think-tank, apparently welcomed his presence as a provocateur.
By Brian Czech / 26 November 2018
How ironic for the Washington Post to opine “Earth may have no tomorrow” and, two pages later, offer up the mini-bios of William Nordhaus and Paul Romer, described as Nobel Prize winners. Without more rigorous news coverage, few indeed will know that Nordhaus and Romer are epitomes of neoclassical economics, that 20th century occupation isolated from the realities of natural science. Nordhaus... Read more
By Frederick Knight / 25 November 2018
Georgia’s 2018 midterms have become a battleground for voting rights and election integrity. After Secretary of State Brian Kemp was sued for suppressing minority votes ahead of the Nov. 6 election, a court ruled his office must validate the pending voter registrations of 3,000 naturalized citizens.
By Emma McIntosh & David Bruser / 23 November 2018
Despite years of public promises from officials that the tailings ponds would shrink and go away, they are growing. And in the meantime, troubling gaps are opening in the oversight system meant to ensure the oilpatch cleans up its mess. Alberta has collected only $1 billion from companies to help remediate tailings— a problem that is now estimated to cost about 100 times that.
By David Archer / 23 November 2018
The thing that really gets me in the gut about global warming from fossil fuel combustion is how long it will last. Carbon mined from the deep Earth and injected into the “fast carbon cycle” of the atmosphere, ocean, and land surface will continue to affect atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and climate, for hundreds of thousands of years into the future, unless we clean up the atmosphere ourselves.
By Dean Kuipers / 15 November 2018
IT’S PRETTY EASY to paralyze America’s oil infrastructure. All Emily Johnston and Annette Klapstein needed was a set of 3-foot-long green-and-red bolt cutters. And a willingness to go to jail for years. On October 11, 2016, as they pulled up to an oil pipeline facility in the farm fields outside Leonard, Minnesota, the pair were bent on taking direct action to address climate change, since, they... Read more
By Kate Aronoff / 15 November 2018
Some scientists say it’s necessary to save the climate. An indigenous-led opposition says it will only save the fossil fuel economy.

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