GST Original Articles

By Henry Robertson / 14 November 2017
Renewable electricity is booming. Wind electricity is now the cheapest kind there is. Solar power, even when combined with storage batteries to function when the sun doesn’t shine, can be had on the wholesale markets at a price competitive with natural gas, the cheapest fossil fuel. Suddenly it looks like we really can get 100% of our electricity from renewables and do it economically. There are still plenty of naysayers who point to the intermittency of the wind and sun as insuperable... Read more
By Stan Cox / 13 November 2017
. At the heart of America’s mainstream climate movement lies a contradiction. On the one hand, the movement raises alarms about the looming eco-dystopia that grows more menacing by the day. In just the past two months, supercharged wildfires and hurricanes have laid waste to vulnerable communities from the West Coast through the Sunbelt to the Caribbean. From the austerity-strangled countryside of Puerto Rico to agricultural workers’ communities in Florida to Santa Rosa’s trailer parks,... Read more
By Don Fitz / 02 November 2017
Will Black Become the New Green? by Don Fitz On November 7, 2017, Elston McCowan could well become the first Green Party candidate to defeat a Democrat in Missouri. If he wins the Ward 2 race in St. Louis City he will also become the first black Green Party candidate to beat a Democrat in an overwhelmingly black district. And it might not be crazy to think that McCowan can actually win. In 2015, he received 37% of the vote as the Green Party candidate against an incumbent. That... Read more
By Stan Cox / 30 October 2017
The more convenient and efficient autonomous electric cars turn out to be, the worse their impact on greenhouse emissions The automakers and IT giants are predicting that autonomous vehicles (AVs or “driverless cars”) will play a big role in reducing America’s currently extravagant emissions of greenhouse gases. In this claim (as in the assertion that flying cars will be more energy efficient than helicopters), climate mitigation is serving not as a goal but as a selling point for a... Read more

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More Reading Recommended by GST

By Chad Hanson and Mike Garrity / 15 November 2017
A number of politicians have promised to weaken environmental laws and increase logging, supposedly to stop forest fires. Here’s what they aren’t telling you. Fires, including large fires, are a natural and ecologically necessary part of forests in the Northern Rockies. Dozens of plant and animal species, such as the black-backed Woodpecker, depend upon post-fire habitat—including patches of... Read more
By Elizabeth Kolbert / 13 November 2017
Carbon Engineering, a company owned in part by Bill Gates, has its headquarters on a spit of land that juts into Howe Sound, an hour north of Vancouver. Until recently, the land was a toxic-waste site, and the company’s equipment occupies a long, barnlike building that, for many years, was used to process contaminated water. The offices, inherited from the business that poisoned the site, provide... Read more
By Ish N Mishra / 12 November 2017
The term Dialectical Materialismwas not used by Marx himself but by subsequent Marxists to delineate the synthesis of Marx’s critiques of Hegel’s Dialectics, which he called idealist and Feuerbach’s materialism, which he called mechanical or metaphysical. For the first time the term Dialectical Materialism was used by Plekhanov in 1891.Five years after Marx’s death Engels expressed his and Marx’s... Read more
By Ramzy Baroud / 11 November 2017
To a certain extent, Aung San Suu Kyi is a false prophet. Glorified by the west for many years, she was made a ‘democracy icon’ because she opposed the same forces in her country, Burma,  at the time as the US-led western coalition that was isolating Rangoon for its alliance with China. Aung San Suu Kyi played her role as expected, winning the approval of the Right and the admiration of the Left... Read more
By Shelley Connor / 09 November 2017
The number of people suffering from malnutrition worldwide rose to 815 million in 2016, rising by 38 million from the year before. According to a new report co-signed by five United Nations agencies and charities, and made public by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the UN (FAOUN) on Friday, this was the first such year-to-year increase since the beginning of the 21st century. The... Read more
By John Bellamy Foster / 03 November 2017
The prevailing liberal approach to ecological problems, including climate change, has long put capital accumulation before people and the planet. It is maintained that through new technologies, demographic shifts (such as population control), and the mechanisms of the global “free market,” the existing system can successfully address the immense ecological challenges before us. In short, the... Read more
By Alan Broughton / 29 October 2017
The term Green Revolution refers to the introduction of high-yielding varieties of staple food crops, particularly wheat and rice, into Third World countries, starting in the 1960s. Initially Mexico, India and the Philippines were targeted. The stated aim was to increase food production to end hunger and prevent uprisings. The Green Revolution did increase agricultural production, and no more... Read more

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