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03/09/2018 - 4:40pm
By Don Fitz

Democratic Production and the Workers' Opposition of Revolutionary Russia (Part 1)

by Don Fitz

In a post-capitalist society, who should control production? How should decisions about worklife be made? Who should decide what is produced, where it is produced and how it is exchanged within a country and between countries? For the first time in history, the great Russian Revolution of 1917 had to confront these issues in more than a theoretical way. The issues became painfully pragmatic during...

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02/22/2018 - 8:42pm
By Priti Gulati Cox

The Palestinian cause is not just for Palestinians, not even just for Arabs. The Palestinian cause is a humanitarian cause. What makes me happy is to see the humanitarians of the world stand with us in solidarity to free our land.

— Ahed Tamimi, Empire Files:...

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02/22/2018 - 4:09pm
By Stan Cox

Stanford professor Mark Jacobson and his colleagues have written yet another paper purporting to show that 100 percent of energy demand can be fulfilled by wind, solar, and hydroelectric generation....

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02/22/2018 - 7:40am
By Martin Donohoe

The History and Consequences of War

The history of war begins approximately 13,000 to 10,000 years ago, with the advent of agriculture and the subsequent development of non-migratory populations, the division of labor, and the development of class structures, specifically the rise of a warrior class supported by these populations’ leadership and citizens as a means of both further enrichment and protection. Over time, weapons became increasingly sophisticated. Bronze weapons and armor were developed 3,500 years ago, iron weapons 2200 years ago, and the widespread use of...

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02/22/2018 - 7:35am
By Martin Donohoe

Introduction

In the mid nineteenth century, English social reformer Edwin Chadwick established an association between appalling living conditions and poor health. Soon thereafter, Rudolph Virchow, the founder of both modern pathology and the field of social medicine, recognized the link between rising rates of infectious disease and crowded, poorly maintained housing. In the absence of diagnostic tools and effective treatments for rampant infectious diseases, many of the advances in health of the 19th and early 20th century resulted from improvements in housing,...

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02/14/2018 - 1:17pm
By Lisi Krall

Stan Cox recently published several articles making the unpopular argument that confronting the problem of climate change with any commitment to energy justice, social justice, and any reasonable expectation for retaining necessary ecological balances, cycles and integrity will...

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02/11/2018 - 4:57pm
By Henry Robertson

Robots will take over the world, maybe soon. This is a view held by eminent scientists like Stephen Hawking and James Lovelock.

Physicists and engineers are building artificial intelligences (AIs) that are smarter than we are, but they’re still computers. Will they be able to develop consciousness and a sense of their own self-interest? If our AI scientists are going to stave off robot rebellion, they’ll need to use whatever edge they still have over their creatures to program them with goals that are reliably, permanently aligned with human goals.

After reading Max...

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01/25/2018 - 3:25pm
By Ellen Brown

How Uncle Sam Launders Marijuana Money

Ellen Brown

http://WebofDebt.wordpress.com

January 23, 2018

In a blatant example of “do as I say, not as I do,” the US government is profiting handsomely by accepting marijuana cash in the payment of taxes while imposing huge penalties on banks for accepting it as deposits. Onerous reporting requirements are driving small local banks to sell out to Wall Street. Congress needs to harmonize...

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01/13/2018 - 7:16pm
By Don Fitz

When I shook hands with Eric Greitens following the 2016 debate for Missouri Governor, none of us on the Green team imagined that, a year before, he had tied a woman up, blindfolded her, undressed her, photographed her and warned that he would release the photo if she ever said what happened. The story made local and US news on January 11, 2018 when the now-Governor Greitens followed his “State of the State” address with an admission that he had had an affair, that he and his wife had come to terms with it, and they wanted to get on with their lives.

He failed to mention whether...

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01/11/2018 - 1:29pm
By Stan Cox

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.The Earth is having to deal with continuous, largely unchecked emissions of greenhouse gases, along with soil degradation, mass extinction of species, destruction of ecosystems, and disruption of nitrogen, phosphorous, and water cycles. Meanwhile, efforts to head off the planet-wide ecological...

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01/08/2018 - 6:08am
By Ellen Brown

Student Debt Slavery II:

Time to Level the Playing Field

Ellen Brown

http://EllenBrown.com

January 5, 2018

This is the second in a two-part article on the debt burden America’s students face. Read Part 1 here.

The lending business is heavily stacked against student borrowers. Bigger players can borrow for almost nothing...

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12/30/2017 - 1:31pm
By Ellen Brown

Ellen Brown

http://EllenBrown.com

December 26, 2017

Higher education has been financialized, transformed from a public service into a lucrative cash cow for private investors.

The advantages of slavery by debt over “chattel” slavery – ownership of humans as a property right – were set out in an infamous document called the Hazard Circular, reportedly circulated by British...

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12/30/2017 - 12:50pm
By R. Burke

Lenin 2017

In recent years Marxist philosopher Slavoj Zizek has engaged in a rather interesting project: editing and introducing writings by great revolutionary leaders. In 2002 Revolution at the Gates, a collection of Lenin’s writings from 1917 (including the critical “April Theses”) was published. In 2007 writings by Robespierre, Trotsky, and Mao for Verso’s “Revolutions” series followed. The most recent offering is Lenin 2017: Remembering, Repeating, and Working Through.

Lenin 2017 is a collection of Lenin’s final writings. These are...

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11/19/2017 - 2:03am
By Ted Trainer

The potential and limits to renewable energy are hotly debated, and far from settled. Many people take it for granted that it can meet all our energy needs, and numerous impressive agencies and technical reports say this.  However until the last few years when simulations based on detailed weather data have become available nearly all pronouncements have been little more than speculation and most have simply selected bits of evidence to confirm preferred beliefs. I have examined about ten of these and have published various analyses showing how unsatisfactory they are. There are now...

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11/14/2017 - 3:25pm
By Henry Robertson

Renewable electricity is booming. Wind electricity is now the cheapest kind there is. Solar power, even when combined with storage batteries to function when the sun doesn’t shine, can be had on the wholesale markets at a price competitive with natural gas, the cheapest fossil fuel.

Suddenly it looks like we really can get 100% of our electricity from renewables and do it economically. There are still plenty of naysayers who point to the intermittency of the wind and sun as insuperable obstacles to grid reliability, but there’s no risk of that anytime soon. The National Renewable...

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11/13/2017 - 9:39am
By Stan Cox

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At the heart of America’s mainstream climate movement lies a contradiction.

On the one hand, the movement raises alarms about the looming eco-dystopia that grows more menacing by the day. In just the past two months, supercharged wildfires and hurricanes have laid waste to vulnerable communities from...

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11/02/2017 - 12:04pm
By Don Fitz

Will Black Become the New Green?

by Don Fitz

On November 7, 2017, Elston McCowan could well become the...

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10/30/2017 - 8:52am
By Stan Cox

The more convenient and efficient autonomous electric cars turn out to be, the worse their impact on greenhouse emissions

The automakers and IT giants are predicting that...

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10/15/2017 - 12:08pm
By Priti Gulati Cox

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The Indian government looks on as right-wing Hindu extremists take deadly aim at some of the country’s bravest dissenters

If I were to describe Islam in three words, there is nothing there besides sex, crime and murder. So the question for you is not whether Rohingya will stay here or the Musulman...

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10/09/2017 - 6:07pm
By Rupen Savoulian

In just three months, cholera has killed nearly 2,000 people and infected more than a half million, one of the world’s largest outbreaks in the past 50 years.

While the corporate media’s attention is focused on the humanitarian crisis gripping hurricane-ravaged nations in the Caribbean and regions of the United States, the...

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